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President Donald Trump’s Man to Stop Election Fraud: Ken Blackwell

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This column by Thomas was published May 11, 2017 by The Political Insider.

In the 2016 presidential campaign, we saw problems with questionable voter registration and mass fraud. Left-leaning states such as California issue drivers licenses to illegal aliens, which is a big reason why approximately 2 million non-citizens were registered to vote, according to the National Hispanic Survey. This presented a major hurdle for President Trump’s campaign, which made his November victory even more impressive.

Now in the White House, Trump is launching an “election integrity” commission to explore just how many millions illegally voted in the election, which will be run by Vice President Mike Pence and Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach.

As The Daily Caller reports:

“The Commission will review policies and practices that enhance or undermine the American people’s confidence in the integrity of Federal elections,” an official told The Daily Caller on background. “This will include reviewing laws and activities that lead to improper registrations, improper voting, fraudulent registrations, fraudulent voting, and voting suppression.”

Former Ohio Secretary of State Ken Blackwell is expected to be on the commission. A prominent figure in the conservative movement and leader of President Trump’s domestic transition team, Blackwell’s impressive credentials include being named Chairman of the respected and bipartisan International Foundation for Electoral Systems.

Despised by the left for his conservative activism, Blackwell took a no-nonsense approach to voter integrity as Ohio Secretary of State during President George W. Bush’s heated 2004 campaign. Later, in 2009, he was published in the Yale Law and Policy Review about “safeguarding the the integrity of the ballot box.”

Others being considered for inclusion are Connie Lawson, who is the secretary of state of Indiana, Bill Gardner, the secretary of State of New Hampshire, Matthew Dunlap, the secretary of state of Maine, and Christy McCormick, the commissioner for the Election Assistance Commission.

Just days after he was sworn in as president, Trump told a group of congressional leaders that he lost the popular vote because millions voted illegally, but didn’t provide evidence. He later tweeted that he would launch an investigation into the voter fraud. Now, he’s keeping his promise.